April 20, 2017

Don’t Let Last Week Use Up Too Much Of This Week…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:04 am

…and “Don’t let yesterday use up too much of today.”

 

Hey Passengers age is a funny thing, isn’t it? It’s both an internal and external measurement by which many of us, consciously or not, judge our successes and failures, and how we are often judged by others: “she’s so young to be CEO;” “he’s too old to be a quarterback now;” “those guys should have stopped touring years ago;” “how old is that woman he’s dating?”

Measurement is part of our culture.

LIVE | LEARN | LEAVE

Paradoxically, the paths most of us initially choose for our lives usually happen at times when we are the least prepared to understand the significance of our decisions.

It took me until I reached “mid-life” while, simultaneously, hitting rock bottom to finally change the course of my life and, most importantly, to learn how to let go of the “whys,”  “what ifs,” and “if only” that had become my everyday mantras for a while.

It’s not easy to put your past in perspective and ignore cultural measurements, and it can be unnerving to allow yourself the time and space to evolve, but from my experience the mistakes, bad choices, and seemingly insurmountable challenges you may now be facing are truly fixable.

And once you decide you’re ready, you’ll find that it’s cathartic (and, yes, a little frightening) to give yourself some time to find your true path—however you define that for yourself.

The quote in the beginning says not to let yesterday take up too much of today, it doesn’t say: “don’t ever look back.”

I believe that while “never” looking back is a noble goal, it is very difficult for many people to do—especially me—without the kind of awareness that comes only from distance. So I chose a quote that, for me, was accessible, allowing me the space to safely pause and reflect, and then inspiring me to act when I was ready. You, too, will find the right words for you, if you haven’t already.yard

It took many years, a traumatic event, and a couple of near death experiences for me to, essentially, start my life over. And still it was difficult and I was afraid when I made that decision; change is scary regardless of it being “right.”

The simplest realization that “Change Happens” regardless, helped me gain clarity and perspective, and then time gave me the confidence and courage to act. And remember cultural measurement? I measure myself differently now, and I actively learn from people of all ages.

This is my story so far. I encourage you to find your inspiration and motivation to help you on your journey and then perhaps you’ll share your story.

Most importantly, you need to know—not just “believe”—there is a right time for you to change, no matter how hard, no matter your age, no matter the obstacles. If you feel in your heart that you are not where you want to be it is never too late. Be your own light; the universe will wait for you.

All Aboard!  The LifeTrain!!!

 

April 5, 2017

The A(wkward) Word…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:14 am

Hey passengers, climb aboard today as we take a look at eh A word…”Awkward’.  As I help you up into your car off the platform I hand you a white business card with black raised letters that say:

“That was Awkward,” “SO what!!??”.

Don’t you just hate it when you are caught off-guard in an awkward situation? As uncomfortable as they are, awkward situations seem to have a purpose: to alert us of social expectations and boundaries — and motivate us to avoid making the same mistake twice.  Social awkwardness works as a “social early warning system.” People tend to pay extra attention to the social atmosphere during an awkward moment by, for example, being unable to take their eyes off the person who told the off-color joke.

At the same time, they’re acutely aware of their own physical discomfort, be it in the form of a blushing face, a pit in the stomach or a racing heart.

But the advantages of awkwardness have their limit. Consider the people who seem to find nearly every situation awkward or who find such moments so cringe-worthy that they avoid experiences with a high potential for awkwardness, such as first dates or networking events.

“If socially awkward experiences lead one to panic and avoidance, then these experiences can become central to a self-perpetuating pattern of social fear and avoidance,

Whether you burst into the wrong meeting, say goodbye to someone before continuing on the same path or get trapped in a conversation that’s more silence than dialogue, awkward situations are a part of life.

“We all have these [experiences]. The trick is deciding how meaningful they are and how much they’re getting in the way for you. “Typically, it’s not the awkward moments that are the problem, it’s how you interpret them or make sense of them.”  Give this fun video a shot…(some of the best parts are at the end).  Have fun with it!
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