July 25, 2016

Welcome to the LifeTrain Radio Station and BLOG

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 2:40 am
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PRESS RADIO PLAYER BUTTON UPPER RIGHT.  ENJOY YOUR TIME ABOARD THE TRAIN!

The Courage To Quit…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 1:00 am

“Celebrate endings, for they precede new beginnings.” ~Jonathan Lockwood Huie

All Aboard!  Well passengers, enjoy the ride by reading on…and enjoy the LifeTrain Radio while you are here.

We often think of quitting as failure. We commend people for carrying on when times get rough. The heroes in our action movies don’t just give up when things get difficult. When was the last time you saw Steven Seagal walk away from a fight?

As the saying goes, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” Society expects us to fight back and battle on.

But sometimes, quitting is most definitely the right thing to do.

Sometimes, it’s the best option. A lot of people assume that it’s the easy thing to do—that only defeatists and good-for-nothin’ drop outs would even consider such a “cop-out.” This is not the case.

I learned this myself when I finally make that looming decision to end unhealthy relationships.” Even the words sound negative, as if I’ve fallen away from society, failing to meet my expectations. But I don’t see my decision as a negative thing at all, and oftentimes it wasn’t the easy thing to do.

I remember feeling imprisoned at times.  The longer I stayed, the more trapped I felt.f123

I could have continued going against my instincts; it would have been easier to sail along, ignoring my unhappiness for a few more years instead of stepping out into the world alone.  But I knew in my gut that the situation at the time wasn’t right for me, and that I needed something new. So I left, and no matter what friends, family, or acquaintances thought the decision, I know it was the right choice for me.

It doesn’t mean I was weak; it means I was brave enough to change what wasn’t right.  Sometimes you feel in your gut that the path you thought you were meant to take is wrong for you. It takes a lot of courage to admit that, even to yourself, let alone to the rest of the world. Sometimes you have to leave that path and find a new one. Or, if there is no new path to be found, create a new one.  This can apply to so many aspects of life—home, work, education, family, friends, relationships, and habits.

I’m not saying that if something doesn’t feel right or instantly work out that you should give up on it straight away. Carrying on is also brave and can be the right decision. But if you know that quitting something is the right thing to do, don’t be afraid to do so because of what others might think.

Make a change in your life if you know you need to…

We only have a limited amount of time and yet a limitless number of different paths to go down. Don’t waste your time on one that feels wrong, on something that is compromising your happiness. Find something new.  We all quit something at some point, so don’t fear the stigma.  Do what brings you happiness. Embrace the change.

“There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors.” ~Aldous Huxley.

Open some doors and let the air in. Breathe.

All Aboard!  The LifeTrain!!!

July 10, 2016

About days everything seems to just go wrong…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:28 pm

All Aboard!  Greetings Fellow passengers!

On some days everything seems to just go wrong.  And sometimes it is not just days we’re talking about. But a week or months when things feel tough and rough and you just want to go home and give up.  I’ve had many such days and periods but over the years I have also become a lot better at handling them and not letting them drag me down.  So today I’d like to share 3 things to remember when your whole day, week or month(s) seems to go wrong.  I hope they’ll be as helpful for you as they have been for me.

1. There is a brand new day tomorrow.

When you come to a fork in the road..Take it. Yogi Bera

When you come to a fork in the road..Take it. Yogi Bera

Just because this day or the last week didn’t go well doesn’t mean that there is not a brand new day tomorrow.  A day when you can start anew. With taking action to move towards what you want, likely having a bit more luck and when it will be easier to see that this difficult time is only temporary and not permanent (even if it might feel that way right now).

2. I have handled tough situations in the past.

When you are standing in the middle of things going wrong then you might get a bit panicky. And lose faith in yourself and your abilities.  Then look to the past for a bit of strength and confidence in what you can do.  Doing this helps me to feel like I am standing on firmer ground again. And sometimes I can even find a solution I used for another challenge in the past that I can reuse or read just to get me out of this situation too.

3. What is going well in my life though?

It is very easy to get stuck in focusing on the negative things and so they drag you further and further down into self-criticism and negativity.  But don’t forget that there are still things that are going well in your life. It may be small things. Or things you often take for granted like a roof over your head, clean water or three steady meals every day.  I find that zooming out in this way helps me a lot to snap out of destructive thought patterns and to feel more level-headed again.

Have a “Super Fantastic” week ahead!  All Aboard!

The LifeTrain!

June 27, 2016

The Secret Life of Grief …

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 8:35 pm

I just celebrated Fifty-seven years of life.  But there was a bit of sadness involved.  Last fall marked almost five years since I lost my mother.

I still remember the day we had her admitted to Hospice.  The next morning a knock came at my bedroom window which was at the time my converted basement — it didn’t come to my front door; a sure sign bad news was coming. There was no way to say what my friend had to say next, so she just spat it out like sour milk: your mother has passed away.  It seems that no one had been able to

That fall...

That fall…

reach me via phone because of course…the battery was dead.  So she was contacted and thus became the bearer of bad news.

It’s been five years since that terrible fall.  Much of it still doesn’t make sense to me, but the passing of time has softened the rawness of my grief and allowed moments of lightness to find their way back into my life, the way sunrise creeps around the edges of a drawn window shade.

Losing someone to a prolonged chronic illness makes you certain you’ll never see another sunrise, much less appreciate one. It isn’t true. I’m fifty-seven years old now and my life is bigger, scarier, and more fulfilling than I ever could have imagined. Grief helped get me here.

Grief is not something you can hack. There is no listicle that can reassemble your busted heart. But I have found that grieving can make your life richer in unexpected ways. Here are a few truths the biggest loss of my life has taught me:

  1. Dying is really about living.
Time...

Time…

I resented everyone who said some version of that old platitude, “Time heals all wounds.” Experience has taught me that time doesn’t offer a linear healing process so much as a slowly shifting perspective.

In the first raw months and years of grieving, I sometimes pushed away family and friends, afraid that they would leave too. With time, though, I’ve forged close relationships and learned to trust again. Grief wants you to go it alone, but we need others to light the way through that dark tunnel.

  1. No one will fill that void.

I have a mom-shaped hole in my heart. Turns out it’s not a fatal condition, but it is a primal spot that no one will ever fill. For a long time, I worried that with the closest relationship in my life suddenly severed, I would never feel whole again. Who would ever understand me in all the ways my mother did?

These days I have a very strong female role model in my life, but I harbor no illusions that she will take my mom’s place. I’ve slowly been able to let go of the guilt that I was replacing or dishonoring her by making room for others. Healing is not an act of substituting, but of expanding, despite the holes we carry.

  1. Be easy on yourself.

In the months after losing my mother, I was clumsy, forgetful and foggy. I can’t recall any of the sporting or social events I attended during that time. Part of my grieving process entailed beating myself up for what I could not control, and my brain fog felt like yet another failure.

In time, the fog lifted and my memories returned. I’ve come to see this as my mind going into survival mode with its own coping mechanisms.

Being kind to myself has never been my strong suit, and grief likes to make guilt its sidekick. Power walking, music, and journaling are three practices that help remind me that kindness is more powerful than listening to my inner saboteur.

  1. Use whatever works.

I’m not a Buddhist, but I find the concept of letting go and not clinging to anything too tightly to be powerful.

Heal...

Heal…

I found solace in Joan Didion’s memoir “The Year of Magical Thinking”.

I’m a devout Christian, so I found my voice in a ministry I started with some friends.

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all grieving method. Much of it comes down to flailing around until you find what works. Death is always unexpected; so too are the ways we heal.

  1. Gratitude wins.

We always feel that we lost a loved one too soon. My mom gave me fifty-two good years. Of course I would’ve liked more time, but self-pity and gratitude are flipsides of the same coin; choosing the later will serve you in positive ways, while the former gives you absolutely nothing.

  1. Choose to thrive.

My mom and I share similar temperaments. After her death, I worried I was also destined for an unhappy outcome. This is one of the many tricks that grief plays: it makes you think you don’t deserve happiness.

It’s easier to self-destruct than it is to practice self-care. I initially coped through isolating myself, but I knew this was only clouding my grieving process. I had to face the pain directly, and write my way through it. So I blogged.

Everyone has their own constructive coping mechanisms, and choosing those, even when it’s hard, is worth it in the long run. My mother may not have been able to find total happiness in her own life, but I know she would want that for me. No one is going to water you like a plant—you have to choose to thrive.

  1. Time heals, but on its own timeline.
Keep going...

Keep going…

“Time heals all wounds” is something I heard a lot. Here’s what I wish I had known: grief time does not operate like normal time. In the first year, the present was obscured entirely by the past. Grieving demanded that I revisit every detail leading up to losing my mom.

As I slowly started to find effective coping mechanisms, I began to feel more rooted in the present. My mood did not have to be determined by the hurts of the past.

There will always be good days and bad. This is the bargain we sign on for as humans. Once we make it through the worst days, we gain a heightened sense of appreciation for the small moments of joy to be found in normal days. Healing comes over time, but only if we’re willing to do the work of grieving.

  1. Let your loss highlight your gains.

I was living in Washington, DC at the time.  It still shocks me that I built a life that I loved there having grown up in Ohio. It’s a gift I attribute to my mom.  She was always supportive of my stubborn desire to pursue a career as a writer.  After she died, the only thing that made sense to me was to write about the experience.  Thus this article.

  1. Heartbreak is a sign of progress.

In the first years after the big loss, I assumed romance was dead to me. Why would I allow someone else to break my heart? Luckily I got past this fear to the point where I was able to experience a long and loving relationship.  I have learned that the rewards of love always trump its risks.

  1. Grief makes us beginners.

    All Aboard

    All Aboard

Death is the only universal, and grieving makes beginners out of all of us. Yet grief affects us all in different ways. There is no instruction manual on how best to cope.

There is only time, day by day and sometimes minute by minute, to feel what works, and to cast aside what does not. In the five years I’ve learned to live without my mother, I’ve tried to see my grieving process as an evolutionary one. Loss has enriched my life in challenging, unexpected, and maybe even beautiful ways.

All Aboard, The LifeTrain!

May 23, 2016

One second…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:13 am

All Aboard!  Hey passengers let’s keep it light today…let’s have a fun ride!

Did you know that each day consists of 86,400 seconds?  Each one containing countless options, possibilities, and decisions, of which only one can emerge. 86,400 seconds.

This is one of them. Enjoy the ride…

YouTube Preview Image

All Aboard!  The LifeTrain!

 

April 19, 2016

Does Art Imitate Reality?

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:12 am

If you ever watch old episodes of the original Start Trek You’d be amazed to see some of the things that were then art, television prop art that are now our reality.  Amazing…

Knowledge is power...

Knowledge is power…

In that same vain, an author by the name of Aldous Huxley wrote the book Brave New World in 1931.  I have surmised that If you had read the book [1930] then, you may have seen it as a clear example of science fiction.  The reality he was describing could clearly never happen in the real world.  Or at least not in the foreseeable future. But if you read the book today, and had no idea when it was originally published, it would raise the classic question as to whether art imitates reality or vice versa.  I’ll leave that question unanswered, but I’d recommend to anyone who hasn’t read that book to get their hands on a copy as soon as possible. It will probably scare you, but it’s well worth the time.

For more background on the book try here: CLICK

 

March 15, 2016

“When the Table Turns” – Legally Speaking” w/ Attorney Ewing Carter III

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:34 am

All Aboard!  Welcome aboard…Glad to see you on board.  As is customary as I help you up onto the Train I hand you a white business card with black raised lettering.  On the front it reads:

“Care giving often calls us to lean into love we didn’t know possible.”

and on the back it reads:

“Care-giving will never be one-size-fits-all.”

I’m advising you to go back to the legal car here on the train for another session with The Attorney, Ewing Carter III.  Also, hit the radio button in the upper right portion of the train to enjoy some music as you  ride (read this article).

Can you believe that Thanksgiving and the holiday season is upon us?  I pray that we will have the opportunity to get together again. While we are all in one place this might be a good time to

Legally Speaking: Elder care...

Legally Speaking: Elder care…

have that tough conversation many of us are facing.  Those of you facing elder care issues will be especially interested in today’s conversation   So, with no further ado let’s head back to the Law car and pick Mr. Carter’s brain.

Enjoy the LifeTrain Radio while you peruse this and other “blog” articles!

Chuckie:  Attorney Carter!  Greetings Sir!
EC III:  Hey Chuckie, come on in and sit a spell.

Chuckie:  Sir, our passengers really want to know, who was one of the baddest football players ever to come out of Springfield South High School?

EC III:  Me.

Chuckie:  GONG!  Wrong answer.  I’ll give you another try.  Who was the Captain of your senior year football team.
EC II:  Look man, “you” …Ok?  Now what is the question, I’m sure the passenger’s time is just as valuable as mine.

[LOUD LAUGHTER]

Chuckie:  Ok, OK, you lawyers and money.

Chuckie:  Today’s question chosen of a great many good questions from our loyal passengers is this:  My elderly mother is confined to a wheelchair and can’t get around. I’m

the only one who helps her. My brothers live in another state and have their own lives with their families.  Can I get something from the court that allows me to take care of her daily needs?  I’m fearful that she’s beginning to lose her memory.  What can I do?

EC III:  If your mother is of “sound mind” which means that her faculties of perception and judgment are not impaired by any mental disorder, then, executing a Power of Attorney would be

helpful in this situation.  Because your mother’s mobility is limited, your acting as her attorney- in- fact will enable her to transact her business by and through you.  In most cases a General

www.EcarterLaw.com

www.EcarterLaw.com

Durable Power of Attorney is preferred because it remains in effect until revoked and canceled by a subsequent instrument in writing.  Also, this power of attorney does not terminate upon disability, incompetence, or incapacity.  Basically, your mother’s power of attorney giving you authority to act in her stead is enforceable until her death, or until she revokes it.

However, if your mother now suffers from Alzheimer’s disease or any associated form of dementia, then she Does not possess the capacity to give power of attorney.  Your mother’s primary physician can provide you an Opinion Letter concerning her mental capacity.  Once you have the letter, you should file a petition to find her incompetent by the Courts.  Once the Petition is filed and a Hearing scheduled, a determination of competency will be made by the Clerk of Courts.  If and when, she is adjudicated incompetent, the Courts will: 1) appoint someone as Guardian of her Person, and 2) appoint someone Guardian of her Estate.  This can be the same person or entity, or two different persons or entities.  The Guardian of the Person makes decisions concerning health care, housing, daily activities, etc. The Guardian of the Estate makes all financial decisions concerning the person.  As always mentioned, consult with an attorney in your locale for specific advice.   I hope that helps.

Chuckie:  Thanks Attorney Carter, good stuff…as usual.  Passengers, for more on this debilitating disease check out my upcoming article with Dr. Dee PhD.
Chuckie:  You know Mr. Carter, this was another great session.  I’ve now figured out that you are a much better lawyer than a football player.
EC III:  Yep…and you are a much better water boy than golfer.

Chuckie:  See you on the links dude!  And now passengers, for your favorite part of “Legally Speaking!”

You can learn more about Attorney Carter at the: www.ECARTERLAW.com

 

February 23, 2016

Two Things: Neva Give Up & Refuse to Be Bitter…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 12:55 am

ALL ABOARD!
All Aboard!  Welcome passengers…welcome back aboard the LifeTrain.  As you board, here’s one of those black and white business cards I like to hand you as I help you up the steps onto the train for today’s ride.  It reads:

ltcard

 

Today on the LifeTrain we have a guess speaker to help get our week kicked off to a great start.  I asked Pastor Warren to give us a word of encouragement to help us sail through the week.  Remember, anytime life throws a curve at you this week…pull that card from above out and “BE HAPPY!”.



Don’t Give Up: Refuse to Be Bitter

by Rick Warrenrws

“Job said, ‘I came naked from my mother’s womb and I shall have nothing when I die. The Lord gave me everything I had, and they were his to take away. Blessed be the name of the Lord!’ In all of this Job did not sin by blaming God.” (Job 1:21-22 LB)

Grief is a part of life, but you can’t let a season of grief turn into a lifestyle of grief.

At some point you have to let it go!

There is a difference between mourning and moaning, weeping and wallowing. A loss can deepen me, but that doesn’t mean it can define me. A loss is a part of my maturity but not my identity.

God gives you grace to get through what you’re going through. Others don’t get that grace, so they may give you bad advice!

“Job’s wife said to him, ‘Are you still trying to maintain your integrity? Curse God and die.’ But Job replied, ‘You talk like a godless woman. Should we accept only good things from the hand of God and never anything j1bad?’ So in all this, Job said nothing wrong” (Job 2:9-10 NLT).

Job refused to become bitter and resentful. Bitterness prolongs pain. It doesn’t relieve it; it only reinforces it. “Watch out that no bitterness takes root among you … it causes deep trouble, hurting many in their spiritual lives” (Hebrews 12:15 LB).

Job gives three steps in refocusing:

1. Put your heart right. That means you forgive. “But I can’t forgive!” you say. That’s why you need Christ in your life; he’ll give you the power to forgive.

2. Reach out to God. Ask him to come into your heart and heal those wounds and help you and give you strength and power for tomorrow, next week, next month.

3. Face the world again, firm and courageous. Many people, when they’re hurt, withdraw into a shell. They say, “I’ll never let anybody hurt me again!” They retire from life. Job says to do the exact opposite: Resume your life; don’t retire from it. Get back out there in the world.

There’s a happy ending to Job’s life. “The Lord blessed the last part of Job’s life even more than he had blessed the first” (Job 42:12a GNT). Job went through all this hurt, but, in spite of that, God blessed the last part of his life even more than he had the first.

Wouldn’t you like the same in your life? Say, “God, I don’t care whether I have five years or 50 years left. Would you bless the last part of my life more than the first part?”

The lesson of Job’s life is this: It doesn’t matter who’s hurt you or how long you’ve been hurt or how deeply you’ve been hurt. God can make the rest of your life the best of your life if you’re willing to forgive and let go of resentment and release the offender.mm2

Talk About It

  • In grief, why do you think it’s easier for us to draw into ourselves rather than be with the people who will help us move forward?
  • What do you want God to help you accomplish in the rest of your life? What do you need to let go of so that he can work fully through you?

 

Well Passengers…a good word From Pastor Rick eh?  Merry Monday guys and…

ALL ABOARD!!!  The LifeTrain!!!

 

February 16, 2016

The Mindful Mind…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 4:41 am

Hey Passengers, All Aboard!  Here’s a business card as I help you up into the car.  It reads:

 “I know but one freedom and that is the freedom of the mind.” ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Hey passengers, I thought the quote above was appropriate for today’s post…After your ride today I think you’ll feel the same.

 

I was thinking as I mused over this post, my (our) mind is a funny thing. On the one hand, it’s awesome. But on the other, it can pulverize us more quickly and ruthlessly than anything else.

Our mind is inherently scared. That’s its job, to be cautious; to keep us alive, to have us cross roads safely, and not get eaten by a lion. But left unchecked, it can become paralyzed with fear and meaner than a cornered crocodile.

And it’s incredibly bossy.

The tendency of the mind to want to control is so strong and so habitual that we often don’t realize the myriad of times it tries to push our inner wisdom and natural sense of ease and love aside.tht

The bad news is there is no book or course that will change the nature of our mind; the good news—we don’t have to. The problem isn’t our mind, but how we use it.

We feel anxious, fearful, sad, or resentful when we give our mind too much power, when we follow all of its dopey ideas against our better judgment.

Here’s how I spot when my mind is trying to take over.  Hope it helps you as well.

1. When you ignore your natural inclination.

Your mind is smart. Not wise smart, but computer smart.  Your mind isn’t into all that woolly intuition jazz. It wants facts. It likes making calculations. Running the odds.  Say you have a thought to call a friend you haven’t thought of in years. But then your mind says, “Don’t be silly. She’s probably not home. She won’t remember me.”

So you don’t call.

mmanBut have you ever followed one of those inclinations and then looked back and seen, wow, look at everything that happened after?  And what about decisions like what to do with your life?  The logical way is listen to experts or copy what works for other people. Your mind loves this.

This is why we ignore the little voice that says, “You should be a writer,” and choose instead to study statistics, because there are plenty of jobs for statisticians. Or we train to be a dancer because we’re “good at that.  ”Except you aren’t “other people.” And experts aren’t as expert about you as you are. And just because you’re “good at something” doesn’t mean it’s what you want to do.

2. When you want to say “no” but you end up saying “yes.”

Do you have trouble saying “no”?

I used to.  I didn’t even see it as a serious option until I hit my late forties.  It was messy.  I thought there were rules more important than my deep desire not to do something.  Rules like be a good friend, be a good employee, go to lots of parties I didn’t want to go.  Kiss the right butt, shake the right hands and laugh at jokes that didn’t come close to being funny.

This is, of course, a total mind thing. Your mind wants to be liked and it thinks everything is important.  Your mind doesn’t realize that saying “no” isn’t a big deal, or even a medium deal. Or that your intuition is where wisdom lies.  Not only is it your right to do as you genuinely desire, but it benefits everyone when you do.  Awhile back I read “An Angel at My Table”, based on the autobiography of Janet Frame, one of New Zealand’s favorite authors. Janet spent eight years in a psychiatric hospital, had two hundred electroshock treatments, and narrowly escaped a lobotomy only to learn years later that she wasn’t unwell; she just didn’t like being very social, and if she did what she felt like she was fine.

3. When you constantly text or check your phone or email, or Facebook status.

I love the Internet and email and reading comments on my blog. Just love it. What an awesome world we live in.  But often I feel off balance because of it. Or rather, because of how I use it.  And it’s not like I don’t know why I get so hooked on it. I do. I’m looking for approval.sdth

The need for approval goes deep. Not only is it a natural trait of the mind, it’s entrenched by our schooling system.  But it’s dangerous. It keeps you distracted from the present moment and trains you to care when people disapprove. Which they will.  The modern hyper-connected world is addictive. To the mind it’s like candy.

So what’s the answer? Give it all up?

Personally, heck no. But setting limits and removing temptation keeps things in check.

4. When you think, “It’s all very well for them.”

Have you ever heard an inspirational story and thought, “It’s all very well for him, he came from a rowing family. It’s easy for him to row the Northwest Passage.”  You see it all the time and it’s a classic case of your mind resisting change, worried you’ll want to make some leap of your own.  Take Elizabeth Gilbert and her book, Eat, Pray, Love.

It wasn’t a story about traveling around the world. Not really. It was about survival and courage and how one woman used the resources she had to save herself.

dgjThinking, as a few did, that it’s all very well for her she could afford to travel around the world is missing the point.

We all have the ability to get up off our metaphorical bathroom floor. And we all have our own unique set of resources to help us. When your mind is quickly dismissive and judgmental, it’s trying to stop you from seeing this.

5. When you think repetitive, worrying thoughts.

Getting OCD about washing your hands, turning off the stove, or locking the door before you leave is your safety-officer mind working overtime.  While the worry feels real and overwhelming, there’s no reality to it.  Don’t be pushed around by your mind. Thank your mind but tell it you’ll take it from here. Allow one double-check or hand wash. Now leave.  The trick is ignoring the unpleasant thoughts while knowing a bunch of more pleasant ones will be along shortly.

6. When you try and control someone else.

Have you ever thought you knew better than someone else and tried to get them to do things your way?  Just like dozens of times a day, right?  Your mind is certain you have to intervene. You don’t. Your mind thinks it knows best. It doesn’t.  Trying to control other people, in small and big matters, is not only annoying and disrespectful; it stops the flow of life. You miss out.  I don’t know how many times I’ve experienced a profound and unexpected pleasure after I’ve ignored the urge to butt in.

7. When you feel inadequate for being “too negative.”

We’re inundated with messages telling us we should be grateful and positive and the like. They’re well meaning, but ultimatelyjhg unhelpful.  Because here’s the catch.  Your mind regards these ideas as rules and is critical when you fail, as you invariably will. Because seriously, who’s positive or grateful all the time?  A few years ago I had to tell a friend she was a negative person.

Her response: “Okay, so how do I change that.”

“You don’t,”  I said, “You probably won’t always be this way. It’s just how you are right now.”  Whenever you feel inadequate, this is your mind pushing you to “follow the rules.” It’s well intentioned, but misguided.  Accepting how you are, no matter how you are, is the most loving and genuinely positive thing you can do.  And yes, this applies to when you’re being controlling.  It’s your mind’s nature to seek control. It’s neither a good or bad thing, it just is. Sometimes you’ll succumb, other times you won’t. And it’s all perfectly okay…

It’s all ok…

All Aboard!  The LifeTrain!

February 9, 2016

The Gingham Dress…

Category: Thoughts — chuckie @ 3:00 am

All Aboard!  Welcome fellow passengers.  This week on the  LifeTrain a friendly reminder that all are important, despite the clothes we wear …or the skin we wear.  Red, Yellow, Black and White…Jesus loves the little children of the world!

Judge not...

Judge not…

Anyway, when I came across this story…it made me reminisce and laugh because I was in a slightly similar situation MANY years ago.  I was the manager of a rather large data center in the DC earlier in my carer.  We decided to outsource the maintenance of our mainframes.  We had approximately 50 mainframes so this was a very large multimillion dollar data center.  Anyway my assistant (Ron) and I flew to New jersey after he had narrowed down what he thought were some businesses that could handle our account.  After Ron researched some viable options.  We decided to make site visits to make sure the companies were truly large enough to handle an account of our magnitude.

Once we landed at our first site visit there was a party of the company’s officials at the airport (we really were a big account to be wooed) and they were immediately all over Ron.  I might add that we had never met face to face with these guys, but we did do a teleconference prior to screen a bit so they did know my name.  Oh…and I must sheepishly add that Ron is white…and hold on a minute…lemme check…yep, I am black.  Anyway, they were all over Ron and basically ignored me.  After awhile that became more and more obvious.  I was cracking up inside and it was all I could do to keep a straight face.   Well, we get through lunch, tour, meetings..and meetings and right before the limo back to the airport the question was asked, so Ron, do we get the account.  Ron looked at me, kinda turned red and said “Look guys,” “Chuckie’s the decision maker”, “we’ll have to get back to you…”.  I guarantee you, …the stunned looks we got as we bid a due and boarded the Limo were more than worth the price of admission.  True story and so is the following…Oh and of course…don’t judge a book by its cover…
A lady in a faded gingham dress and her husband, dressed in a Homespun threadbare suit, stepped off the train in Boston , and walked timidly without an appointment into the Harvard University President’s outer office.  The secretary could tell in a moment that such backwoods, country hicks had no business at Harvard and probably didn’t even deserve to be in Cambridge

‘We’d like to see the president,’ the man said softly. ‘He’ll be busy all day,’ the secretary snapped. ‘We’ll wait,’ the lady replied.

For hours the secretary ignored them, hoping that the couple would finally become discouraged and go away. They didn’t, and the secretary grew frustrated and finally decided to disturb the president, even though it was a chore she always regretted.

‘Maybe if you see them for a few minutes, they’ll leave,’ she said to him!

He sighed in exasperation and nodded. Someone of his importance obviously didn’t have the time to spend with them, and he detested gingham dresses and homespun suits cluttering up his outer office.

The president, stern faced and with dignity, strutted toward the couple. The lady told him, ‘We had a son who attended Harvard for one year. He loved Harvard. He was happy here. But about a year ago, he was accidentally killed. My husband and I would like to erect a memorial to him, somewhere on campus.’

lessons learnt

lessons learnt

The president wasn’t touched. He was shocked. ‘Madam,’ he said, gruffly, ‘we can’t put up a statue for every person who attended Harvard and died. If we did, this place would look like a cemetery.’

‘Oh, no,’ the lady explained quickly. ‘We don’t want to erect a statue. We thought we would like to give a building to Harvard.’

The president rolled his eyes. He glanced at the gingham dress and homespun suit, then exclaimed, ‘A building! Do you have any earthly idea how much a building costs? We have over seven and a half million dollars in the physical buildings here at Harvard.’

For a moment the lady was silent. The president was pleased. Maybe he could get rid of them now.

The lady turned to her husband and said quietly, ‘Is that all it costs to start a university? Why don’t we just start our own?’

Her husband nodded. The president’s face wilted in confusion and bewilderment. Mr. and Mrs. Leland Stanford got up and walked away, traveling to Palo Alto , California where they established the university that bears their name, Stanford University , a memorial to a son that Harvard no longer cared about.

You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them.